Photo by iuliu illes on Unsplash

Most read

How people traveled hundreds of years ago.

The Industrial Revolution and the development of transportation dramatically increased the popularity of travel. The first steam locomotive in history appeared in 1804, and in 1825 a public railroad from Darlington to Stockton was opened.

Sea travel was not new to Europeans. The whole question was the massiveness of such voyages. The very fact of a voyage by sea could already be recreation and adventure, all the more so as the steamships eventually became real floating mansions.

Our pick
The Titanic's Last Known Photograph

Lone Star Art

An 11x14 print of a photo of the Titanic that symbolizes one of the most terrible tragedies in the world since the advent of technology. This picture should not make you fear traveling, but should serve as a memory of this tragedy.

At all times travel was a dangerous undertaking. Horses could be carried and thrown off, the ship sank, and pedestrians and riders on the great road were awaited by throngs of robbers. A long march seemed suicidal. In some regions of medieval Europe, the family of a wanderer who did not return after 2 years was considered orphaned, and his wife could remarry.

A century later, as the situation of robbery and legislation began to be regulated, new fears arose. Along with the development of transportation came the age of catastrophes. In the nineteenth century alone, when trains were counted, a dozen accidents occurred. Water transport was little safer. Even greater danger was posed by airships, in the fall of which there was almost no chance of survival.


All videos are copyrighted by Creative
Commons
CC BY.

Watch also


All videos are copyrighted by Creative
Commons
CC BY.